DUNGEONS & DRAGONS

DUNGEONS & DRAGONS

My husband and I started playing Dungeons & Dragons with a good friend Dave and his daughters. Yes, a Christian man is allowing his young daughters to play a game like that full of monsters, magic, and mayhem. There’s nothing wrong with it. Despite what a lot of religious people may think of D&D or Harry Potter or any other popular magic enthusiastic entertainment, it can be good, wholesome fun.

There are many attributes that playing a game like D&D can improve in a person.

1. Communication – This is a game where you have to be vocal about what your character is doing or your character is dead. In order for the Dungeon Master and other players to understand what you are trying to do, you have to relay your actions in explicit detail. Once you get the hang of communicating, those skills will transfer into other areas of your life. Dave said he used to be quite the wall flower, but playing D&D forced him out of his shell. He’s a more social person because of it.

2. Critical Thinking– Strategy is another important trait to have in order to survive in the world of D&D. You never know if that next corner you turn waits a fire beetle or a treasure chest. No matter what you find, you have to know how to act in an instant. It certainly keeps you on your toes.

3. Creativity/Story Telling– There is an incredible amount of creativity needed for the sake of character development. Before you begin playing the game, the first task is to create you character. You chose a race, occupation, class, powers, background, etc. Again, this require a great amount of detail. So, you have to be creative and know what traits would best benefit you character.

4. Math -There are many numbers to calculate in this game. Dice, points, square feet, etc. If you can’t already calculate numbers in your head, this game can train your brain to do so. I urge you not to use a calculator, because your brain can calculate much faster if you train it properly.

5. Sharing – Near the end of my group’s gaming we met and included another gamer who made a wonderful addition to the story. Plus, he brought many supplies that we beginners didn’t have and proved to be a tremendous help to our game. Despite some skepticism in allowing a stranger in our midst, we ended up happy to include him.

6. Discouragement of Gambling– All results depend on the luck of the dice. Sometimes, you roll an high number; more often, you roll a low number. It means the difference between killing a goblin and dropping your sword. It brings random luck in to perspective. Before you stop by a crabs table, take a set of dice and roll it 20 times. See how many rolls you can really guess.

7. Religion/Spirituality– Here’s where it gets controversial, but I find it the most important. The D&D deities. We all know that these gods are not real, and the players are not meant to worship them. They are a part of a story. They give the characters background and motivation. They give the characters morals and spirituality. What they don’t give is a reason to turn our backs on God over a game. My D&D group and I are all Christians. We use our spirituality from our faith and contribute it toward the story. We haven’t lost it.

D&D is a fantasy game. Nothing more, and it can be a lot of fun when you allow it to be.

TRUE VALUE IN EDUCATION

TRUE VALUE IN EDUCATION

NOT A FAN (2011)

NOT A FAN (2011)