THE GOLDEN RULE IS COMMON GROUND

THE GOLDEN RULE IS COMMON GROUND

ARE YOU SURPRISED TO KNOW THAT THE GOLDEN RULE IS FOUND IN ALL MAJOR RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD? 

Religion scholar and former nun Karen Armstrong tells of her discovery that the golden rule can be found in all religions. It is the common ground for all faiths.

The Apostle Paul says it so well:
"For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself." - Galatians 5:14

Even Wikipedia notes this:

The Golden Rule or law of reciprocity is the principle of treating others as one would wish to be treated. It is a maxim of altruism seen in many human religions and human cultures. The maxim may appear as either a positive or negative injunction governing conduct:

    One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself (positive or directive form).
    One should not treat others in ways that one would not like to be treated (negative or prohibitive form).
    What you wish upon others, you wish upon yourself (empathic or responsive form).

The Golden Rule differs from the maxim of reciprocity captured in do ut des—"I give so that you will give in return"—and is rather a unilateral moral commitment to the well-being of the other without the expectation of anything in return.

The concept occurs in some form in nearly every religion and ethical tradition. It can also be explained from the perspectives of psychology, philosophy, sociology, human evolution, and economics.

Psychologically, it involves a person empathizing with others.

Philosophically, it involves a person perceiving their neighbor also as "I" or "self".

Sociologically, 'love your neighbor as yourself' is applicable between individuals, between groups, and also between individuals and groups.

In evolution, "reciprocal altruism", is seen as a distinctive advance in the capacity of human groups to survive and reproduce, as their exceptional brains demanded exceptionally long child-hoods and on-going provision and protection even beyond that of the immediate family.

In economics, Richard Swift, referring to ideas from David Graeber, suggests that "without some kind of reciprocity society would no longer be able to exist."

HERE IS THE GOLDEN RULE IN VARIOUS RELIGIONS OLD AND NEW

Ancient Egypt: "That which you hate to be done to you, do not do to another." - Papyrus (c. 664 BC – 323 BC).

Babylonian Talmud: "What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow: this is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation; go and learn."  — Shabbath folio:31a 

Judaism: "The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as one of your citizens; you shall love him as yourself, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt: I the LORD am your God." — Leviticus 19:34

Ancient Greece: "Avoid doing what you would blame others for doing." – Thales (c. 624 BC – c. 546 BC)

Ancient China: "Never impose on others what you would not choose for yourself." — Confucius(c. 500 BC)

Ancient Persia: "Whatever is disagreeable to yourself do not do unto others." - Shayast-na-Shayast 13:29

Christian: "Do to others what you want them to do to you. This is the meaning of the law of Moses and the teaching of the prophets." - Luke 6:31

Islamic Quran: "Wish for your brother, what you wish for yourself" or "Love for your brother what you love for yourself".

Bahá'í Faith: "Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself." — Bahá'u'lláh

Hinduism: "If the entire Dharma can be said in a few words, then it is — that which is unfavorable to us, do not do that to others." — Padmapuraana, shrushti 19/357–358

Buddhism: "Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful." — Udanavarga 5:18

Jainism: "In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all creatures as we regard our own self."  — Lord Mahavira, 24th Tirthankara

Sikhism: "Precious like jewels are the minds of all. To hurt them is not at all good. If thou desirest thy Beloved, then hurt thou not anyone's heart." — Guru Arjan Dev Ji 259, Guru Granth Sahib

Confucianism: "never impose on others what you would not choose for yourself?" -Confucius, Analects XV.24

Taoism: "Regard your neighbor's gain as your own gain, and your neighbor's loss as your own loss." — T'ai Shang Kan Ying P'ien

Scientology: "Try not to do things to others that you would not like them to do to you." — The Way to Happiness, Precept 19 

HUNGRY PEOPLE CAN BE FED.

HUNGRY PEOPLE CAN BE FED.

EMMA WATSON UNDER ATTACK!

EMMA WATSON UNDER ATTACK!